Pete Evans is caught growing a controversial hallucinogenic cactus his back yard

What's that over there, mate? Pete Evans (pictured) was caught growing a controversial hallucinogenic cactus his backyard after posting a video to Instagram on Tuesday

Disgraced MKR judge and conspiracy theorist Pete Evans is caught growing a controversial hallucinogenic cactus his backyard

Pete Evans is no stranger to finding himself in prickly situations.

And the disgraced former My Kitchen Rules judges, 47, raised eyebrows yet again on Tuesday when he was caught growing a hallucinogenic cactus in his backyard. 

The anti-vaxxer and conspiracy theorist uploaded a video to Instagram of himself promoting an episode of his podcast and showing off his newly grown fennel plants. 

What's that over there, mate? Pete Evans (pictured) was caught growing a controversial hallucinogenic cactus his backyard after posting a video to Instagram on Tuesday

What’s that over there, mate? Pete Evans (pictured) was caught growing a controversial hallucinogenic cactus his backyard after posting a video to Instagram on Tuesday 

However, eagle-eyed fans couldn’t help but notice two large San Pedro cacti looming in the background.

Native to the Andean slopes of Ecuador and Peru, the San Pedro cactus contains a psychoactive substance known as mescaline. 

Controversial: Native to the Andean slopes of Ecuador and Peru, the San Pedro cactus contains a psychoactive substance known as mescaline. When consumed, mescaline can cause hallucinogenic effects comparable to those of LSD and psilocybin

Controversial: Native to the Andean slopes of Ecuador and Peru, the San Pedro cactus contains a psychoactive substance known as mescaline. When consumed, mescaline can cause hallucinogenic effects comparable to those of LSD and psilocybin

When consumed, this substance can cause hallucinogenic effects comparable to those of LSD and psilocybin.

It is illegal to grow San Pedro for the purposes of consumption in Pete’s home state of New South Wales.

However, it is legal to grow this plant for ornamental use.

Laws: It is illegal to grow San Pedro for the purposes of consumption in Pete's home state of New South Wales. However, it is legal to grow this plant for ornamental use

Laws: It is illegal to grow San Pedro for the purposes of consumption in Pete’s home state of New South Wales. However, it is legal to grow this plant for ornamental use

What is the San Pedro cactus? 

Native to the Andean slopes of Ecuador and Peru, the San Pedro (echinopsis pachanoi) cactus contains a hallucinogenic substance known as mescaline.

When consumed, it can cause hallucinogenic effects comparable to those of LSD and psilocybin.

While San Pedro has traditionally been used for religious and ceremonial purposes, it is also widely grown as an ornamental cactus.

It is legal to cultivate San Pedro in Australia, New Zealand, the U.S., Canada, Sweden and Germany for ornamental purposes – but not for consumption.

Daily Mail Australia is not suggesting that Pete Evans has or intends to consume any part of his San Pedro cactus.

While Pete hasn’t offered his opinions on the San Pedro cactus, he has long been pushing for the Australian Government to legalise a different plant: cannabis. 

Speaking to The Gold Coast Bulletin in October last year, the father of two declared himself a proud cannabis advocate.

He said: ‘I’m a strong believer every single adult, should they chose, should legally be allowed to grow a few plants to be used as food or medicine.’ 

Outspoken: While Pete hasn't offered his opinions on the San Pedro cactus, he has long been pushing for the Australian Government to legalise a different plant: cannabis. Pete is pictured here at a cannabis farm in the United States

Outspoken: While Pete hasn’t offered his opinions on the San Pedro cactus, he has long been pushing for the Australian Government to legalise a different plant: cannabis. Pete is pictured here at a cannabis farm in the United States

The chef, who has his own cannabis cookbook in the works, added: ‘There’s no reason why we should be able to grow this wondrous plant alongside our other herbs and plants.’

In August this year, Pete released a documentary about medicinal cannabis called The Magic Plant.

However, cannabis advocates have previously voiced concerns over Pete becoming the face of the movement in Australia, and claim his involvement could ‘invite controversy’ into the debate.

Advocate: In August, Pete released a documentary about cannabis called The Magic Plant

Advocate: In August, Pete released a documentary about cannabis called The Magic Plant 

‘We already having trouble in Australia getting doctors to come on-board,’  Lucy Haslam, the founding director of medicinal cannabis advocacy group United in Compassion (UIC), told News Corp in August last year. 

‘If [Pete] becomes the face of medicinal cannabis, it’s going to invite controversy at a time when we’re trying to make people realise it’s a valid medicine,’ she added.

Medicinal cannabis is known to have a range of benefits for those with chronic pain, PTSD symptoms and tremors related to Parkinson’s disease.

The possession, use and cultivation of small amounts of cannabis was legalised in the ACT in September 2019, making it the first Australian jurisdiction to do so.

'We're trying to make people realise it's a valid medicine': Cannabis advocates have previously voiced concerns over Pete becoming the face of the movement in Australia

‘We’re trying to make people realise it’s a valid medicine’: Cannabis advocates have previously voiced concerns over Pete becoming the face of the movement in Australia

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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