Disney puts racism alerts on films Dumbo and Peter Pan after stereotyping uproar

Disney puts racism alerts on films Dumbo and Peter Pan after stereotyping uproar

Disney has released warnings about racism to viewers watching cartoon classics like Dumbo and Peter Pan.

When watched on the Disney+ streaming service, films such as The Aristocats and Jungle Book now flash up a message about stereotypes.

The warning says: “This programme includes negative depictions and/or mistreatment of people or cultures. These stereotypes were wrong then and are wrong now.”

The message adds that rather than remove the content, Disney wants to “acknowledge its harmful impact, learn from it and spark conversation to create a more inclusive future together”.

Dumbo, released in 1941, features singing crows that help Dumbo learn how to fly.

Dumbo, released in 1941, features a lead crow called Jim Crow – referring to a set
 of racist segregationist laws in the southern US

They have exaggerated ­stereotypical black voices.

The lead crow is called Jim Crow – referring to a set of racist segregationist laws in the southern US – and he is voiced by white actor Cliff Edwards.

The Aristocats is an animated musical comedy that shows cats of differing nationalities living together and dealing with their cultural outlooks.

The Asian cat Shun Gon has slanted eyes and buck teeth. He also plays the piano with chopsticks.

And in 1953’s Peter Pan, Native Americans are referred to as “redskins”.

In 1953’s Peter Pan, Native Americans are referred to as “redskins”

The updated content warnings for other classic Disney titles such as Swiss Family Robinson comes after the studio consulted with a third-party advisory council that includes groups like the African-American Film Critics Association and Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment.

The company first added a racism warning last November – however, it was shorter.

Then, the disclaimer read: “This programme is presented as originally created. It may contain outdated cultural depictions.”

Warner Bros, similarly, has long had a warning about “ethnic and racial prejudices” in some of its cartoons.

It says: “While these cartoons do not represent today’s society, they are being presented as they were originally created, because to do otherwise would be the same as claiming these prejudices never existed.”


This post first appeared on mirror.co.uk

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